Event Calendar

Sunday, October 14, 2018

All day
 
 
Before 1am
1am
2am
3am
4am
5am
6am
7am
8am
9am
10am
11am
12pm
1pm
2pm
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4pm
5pm
6pm
7pm
8pm
9pm
10pm
11pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9:30 AM
Room 508
Colloquy: Ideas on Ending Racism
Colloquy: Ideas on Ending Racism
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 9:30am
Room 508

Colloquy is a long-standing discussion group and a mainstay for members to express their opinions on a great many subjects. The group meets at 9:30 on the 2nd Sunday of each month (except July and August).

Put Colloquy on your calendar and be part of the discussion!

Ken Gans will be leading the discussion beginning at 9:30.

 
 
10:30 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 10:30am
Ceremonial Hall
Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve our singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - Joe Chuman: A Humanist's Search for Absolutes
Sunday Platform - Joe Chuman: A Humanist's Search for Absolutes
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

In my universe there are no ghosts, angels or gods. I see and feel no need for a divine custodian. Yet, at the same time, I confess that I am not quite a secular humanist. By temperament I am driven to seek something more than is discernible by the world of sense. I seek for something that does not change beyond the world of flux; something that stands beyond what we know or perhaps can be known. Perhaps it is an idea, an intuition of lasting beauty, impersonal and abstract, yet inextinguishable from my thought and yearning. It is a source of reverence and contemplation that elevates beyond the practical and the fulfillment of mundane aspirations. I plan to share such speculations.

***

Felix Adler, our Movement's founder, once said "Ethical Culture is religious for those who are religiously minded and merely ethical to those who are not so minded." I think what Adler was implying was that whether we view Ethical Culture (and reality as a whole) religiously or not is a function of temperament. And Adler made clear that he was of a religiously minded temperament.

Here's a personal confession of my own. I am a humanist and a philosophical naturist. I believe that nature is all that there is and there is nothing outside of nature. I therefore give no credence to supernaturalism and supernatural beings. In my universe there are no ghosts, angels or gods. I see and feel no need for a divine custodian. Yet, at the same time, I confess that I am not quite a secular humanist. By temperament I am driven to seek something more than is discernible by the world of sense. I seek for something that does not change beyond the world of flux; something that stands beyond what we know or perhaps can be known. Perhaps it is an idea, an intuition of lasting beauty, impersonal and abstract, yet inextinguishable from my thought and yearning. It is a source of reverence and contemplation that elevates beyond the practical and the fulfillment of mundane aspirations. I plan to share such speculations. I hope you can join me.

This week’s shared charity is the Northern New Jersey Sanctuary Coalition, which sponsors people who have applied for political asylum and been released from federal detention, and for selected other asylum seekers — helping them to establish themselves and achieve durable self-sufficiency, with care and support as they become increasingly independent and able to support themselves. Among the services provided are housing, access to medical care, financial support, educational opportunities including language instruction, transportation, social events, liaison with attorneys, and help with job searches and dealing with bureaucratic offices.

Presider: Kathleen O'Connell

Shared Charity: 

 
11:00 AM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Ethics for Children: Publishing Our Ethical Voices
Ethics for Children: Publishing Our Ethical Voices
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 11:00am
Elliott Library, Room 507

Deepali Srivastave, Writefully Ours workshop leader, offers write-raw Ethical prompts. Every second Sunday!

***

11am: Ceremonial Hall, 4th floor - Ethical's inclusive community gathers for greetings and music.

11:15am: Adults and teens may choose to stya for the Morning Meeting. Children will be led to Elliott Library on the 5th floor for an independent project of friendship, creativity, and deed.

12:30pm: Pick-up on the 5th floor or on the playground (6th floor) weather permitting.

Lunch & Social Hour (Cafeteria, 6th floor). Children and teens always eat free! Complimentary lunch for first-time newcomer parents/caregivers.

12:30-2pm Family playground time (6th floor), weather permitting.

Send RSVPs or inquiries to EthicsForChildren@nysec.org. For more information, visit YoungEthicalExplorers.blogspot.com.

 
 
12:45 PM
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
Lunch & Social Hour
Lunch & Social Hour
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 12:45pm
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
 
 
 
 
 
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor
Film & Discussion: Eyes on Mississippi
Film & Discussion: Eyes on Mississippi
Sunday, October 14, 2018 -
1:30pm to 3:30pm
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor

As the southern struggle for civil rights caught fire in the 1960s, its burning core was Mississippi. Bill Minor became the state’s most fearless clear-eyed chronicler. His regular Times Picayune and, even more crucially, anonymous dispatches for The New York Times captured U.S. history, in contrast to most Mississippi coverage, white-supremacist propaganda masquerading as fact.

There were threats and opportunities for Minor to leave the state, yet he remained in Jackson, doggedly reporting from 1947 until the Trump administration. Eyes on Mississippi is a 56-minute film on the most essential reporter the nation has never heard of. Minor died in March 2017 at almost 95, producing his outspoken weekly newspaper column until his last illness.

The story of the impact of one reporter determined to call out racism and government dishonesty carries uncanny resonance in the nation today. Besides Minor, other crucial figures participate in the film: Presidential Medal of Freedom winner John Doar, New York Times journalist Claude Sitton, civil-rights leaders Myrlie Evers, former governor William Winter and Pultizer-Prize winner Hank Klibanoff. The film is a five-year project featuring historic footage and images from 19 archives located across the U.S. The documentary’s producer-director is Ellen Ann Fentress. Co-writer and film editor is Lida Gibson.

The documentary examines how Bill Minor witnessed—and occasionally shaped--U.S. history in his coverage of the civil rights movement. Legendary black leader Medgar Evers trusted Minor as the rare local white reporter with a sense of justice. Truth became costly. Three 1964 Freedom Summer volunteers decided to investigate a church burning in Neshoba County after Minor broke the story. The trio’s resulting murders helped awaken the nation to the stakes of the struggle.

Minor made his name as the New Orleans Times Picayune’s Mississippi correspondent. The documentary makes the case that some of his most crucial reporting, however, was his quiet, anonymous civil-rights coverage for The New York Times and Newsweek. The scant use of contributor bylines in the era kept Minor’s national work unknown to his Times Picayune employers. Despite his anonymity to national readers, he was an open secret to the national press corps, who depended on Minor for information.

The documentary explores how Minor’s position as a witness became a contribution of its own. The title Eyes on Mississippi has two meanings. First, it was the name of Minor’s long-time column, but it also was his strategy. The fastest route to change was getting the raw real facts of the struggle out. The more eyes on Mississippi, the more the pressure for transformation.

Minor won Harvard’s Louis Lyons Award for Conscience and Integrity in Journalism in 1966, as well as Columbia’s John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism in 1997.

Screenings have taken place at the Missouri School of Journalism, Tulane University, Atlanta History Center, Vanderbilt University, Washington College, University of Alabama, numerous other colleges in the South and the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics. A Princeton screening is slated for October.

 
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Room 508
Ethical Death Café
Ethical Death Café
Sunday, October 14, 2018 -
1:30pm to 3:30pm
Room 508

Moderator: Rev. Dr. Barbara Simpson Bereavement Program Community Outreach Coordinator at Caring Hospice Services

Two meetings monthly, 2nd Sunday and 4th Wednesday

Gather in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death, drink tea and eat delicious cake. The objective is to increase awareness of death and help people make the most of their (finite) lives. Topics include heath care proxy, ethical wills, and green burial. 

 
1:30 PM
Adler Study, Room 514
Ethics in The News
Ethics in The News
Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 1:30pm
Adler Study, Room 514

Abe Markman presides

A lively give and take on compelling issues and events